business

Business Spotlight: Good Stuff Expands And Grows

Kathryn Blume 4 Oct 2018

Once upon a time, about 20 years ago, a man named Tom Massey was running a garden-variety antique store in St. Albans. One day, someone came into the shop with some hand-blown pot pipes. Massey took one look at those beauties, and, he says, “The rest is history!”

Massey’s antique shop rapidly transformed into Good Stuff – a variety store full of smokeware, sex toys, gag gifts, and other kinds of…variety.

Instantly recognizable by their smiley-face Jolly Roger logo, there are now Good Stuff stores in 9 cities throughout Vermont, New Hampshire, and New York. As Massey says, “It’s been 20 years of getting to do what I love to do.” 

Recently, prompted by VP of Operations (and Massey’s son-in-law) Mike Salvaty, Good Stuff started developing its own line of cannabis-growing gear and store-branded nutrients. The product line, aptly named Good Stuff Grow, will be ready for the 2019 growing season. 

“We’re targeting beginning growers,” says Salvaty, “with grow tents, nutrients, lights, and other gear – all priced for beginners as well. Also,” he adds, “we’ll have nutrients in volume for commercial growers.”

Massey’s excitement about Good Stuff Grow is both confident and infectious. “We know our customers,” he says. “Our customers are the customers that want to grow, or are growing. And our nutrients are all Vermont-based, organic, and Clean Green Certified.”

Salvaty is also optimistic about public response to their line of grow products. “We believe quality and price matter. I feel if you treat people right and you take care of them,” he says, “they’ll buy from you if they like you, and trust your product.”

Reflecting on Vermont’s process of legalizing cannabis, Salvaty feels that things are moving a little slowly, but Massey is more upbeat. “It’s about time.” he says. “I used to be in the bar business and be around alcohol. Always said I’d rather be in a room full of people smoking marijuana than around a room full of people drunk. Plus,” he adds, “people don’t crash their car on marijuana. The only problem is they drive too slow.”

“We believe quality and price matter. I feel if you treat people right and you take care of them, they’ll buy from you if they like you, and trust your product.”

Both men believe that growing your own in Vermont “is going to be like the beer thing” with local craft growers in a constant process of development and innovation. “People already bring in stuff to us all the time,” says Massey.

Massey, himself, has also grown in his understanding of the power of cannabis. “I thought CBD was baloney,” he says. “I always thought cannabis was just about getting high. But when you sell something for $49 and someone comes back and buys it again…it means something. Even me,” he says. “I had back problems every once in a while. I took some CBD and it cleared right up. CBD is the new aspirin.”

Pass this post:

Related Posts